Saturday, August 1, 2009

Bloom's Taxonomy in Action.



Topic 1 in ETL501 considers the learning and teaching context of information resource provision. That's a bit of a mouthful, but basically it is concerned with the fact that if you're a librarian in a school, you have to consider the information needs of your clientele (students and teachers) in terms of the teaching and learning that is going on.




The way that students learn may differ, as may the teaching approaches of different teachers.




Module 1 of our online study material considers learning in terms of Bloom's Taxonomy. (You can see a graphic representation of it at the top of this post.) We were asked to consider the different sorts of resources students would require when tackling questions at each level of the taxonomy. For example, when asked for a simple definition of a term (Knowledge), a dictionary may be sufficient, but when asked to make an assessment on a complex issue (Evaluate), they will need multiple sources of information including encyclopaedia/reference, primary sources, diagrams/graphics, news/magazine articles, journal articles, TV/DVD programs, websites, relevant government agencies or special interest groups, pamphlets/fact sheets and statistics (such as scientific data).
My fellow students have had a lot of interesting things to say on our forum. Three points interest me particularly:
  1. Linda Blake points out that often literature can provide a new perspective on various issues, and can make them more accessible for some students.
  2. Judy Bolton points out that using different resources provides opportunities for students to learn different skills. For instance, when using texts, encyclopaedias and reference books, attention can be paid to using the glossary, index and table of contents. When using human primary sources the skills of interviewing, notetaking and summarising may be brought to the fore.
  3. Judy also mentions that when students are working at the stages of Analyse and Evaluate, databases such as Opposing Viewpoints, Newstext and Aust/NZ Ref. Centre will be useful.

If you would like to know a little more about using Bloom's Taxonomy when teaching, head to http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/researchskills/dalton.htm to get some ideas.



7 comments:

Alex the Girl said...

It's amazing just how long Bloom's has been in place. Ancient working machine.

Fiona said...

It's interesting looking at it from the perspective of resource provision, which is new for me.

Fiona :)

Fiona said...

Since I posted this, some more interesting contributions to the forum have caught my eye.

1. Suzanne Butler had the following great ideas for resources: kits, an academic partner from a uni,and pictures/paintings. She also noted that if another school was studying the same topic, an online debate might be an option. She also mentions websites that can be used to link to other subjects (such as a rainforest maths site).
2. Annie Tam suggests Brain Pop for interactive lesson, activities, movies, quizzes and databases Questia or Gale for older students.

Thanks for everyone's contributions!

Fiona :)

Fiona said...

Some more interesting responses to the forum...

1. Patricia Pugliese makes the point that often the same resources can be used in different ways for different tasks. She notes that "At the level of evaluation, students are being invited to interact at a much deeper level with the resource". Great point.
2. Alisa Thompson suggests sample units of work as excellent resources to gain ideas about lessons and content, and also BLM (black line masters) for ideas.

How wonderful to be studying with such a bright bunch!

Fiona :)

penszen said...

Hi Fiona. You're doing a brilliant job of summarising the topic. If you come late to the forum, filled as it is with quality information, it's a bit easy to feel overwhelmed. You've managed to pick out some key points. Thanks.

Fiona said...

Thanks Penny!

Fiona :)

Fiona said...

Just adding a couple more interesting contributions to the forum:
1. Louisa Carey suggested the ABC program 'Australian story' (which is archived on the ABC website) as a great resource which takes a personal approach to topical issues.
2. Megan Hall noted that an important resource for new teachers is tips on behaviour management.